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Stephen Kroninger
January 2011
Reagan Centennial
posted:
© Mort Drucker & Norman Mingo 1968
February 6 marks the 100th birthday of President Ronald Reagan.This is a joint post with Robert Newman. He's posting magazine covers and movie posters over on his Newmanology Facebook page while I'm concentrating primarily on illustration.
© Paul Conrad 1967
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1967

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© Robert Grossman 1967
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© David Levine 1968

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© Gerald Scarfe 1969

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© Mort Drucker 1971

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© Jack Davis 1976
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© Ralph Steadman 1980

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© Winston Smith 1981

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© Fallout Productions 1981 (bumper sticker)

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© Sue Coe 1981
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© Victor Juhasz 1981

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© Frances Jetter 1981, Reagan v. the Clean Air Act

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© Philip Burke 1982
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© Carl Smool 1984

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© David Levine 198?

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© Ralph Steadman 1980
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© Henrik Drescher 1984
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© Sue Coe 1984

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© Robert Risko 1984

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© Robert Grossman 1984
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© Marshall Arisman 1984

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© Gary Panter 1984

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© Komar and Melamid 1981, Voice cover 1984

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© Paul Conrad 1984

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© Julian Allen

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© Andy Warhol 1985
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© David Levine 1985, Levine: "...Reagan visited a military cemetery in Bitburg which held the graves of 49 members of the Waffen-SS. Reagan issued a statement that called the Nazi soldiers buried in the cemetery 'victims,' implicitly comparing their deaths to those of Holocaust victims."

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© Edward Sorel 1985
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© Artists Poster Committee 1984, Prior to his weekly radio address on August 11 1984, not realizing the microphone was open, Reagan joked, "My fellow Americans, I'm pleased to tell you today that I've signed legislation that will outlaw Russia forever. We begin bombing in five minutes."

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© Gerald Scarfe 1987
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© Anita Kunz 2001, Arms For Hostages 1987

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Designed by caricaturists Peter Fluck and Roger Law. "A Ronald Reagan molded and painted foam latex puppet used on the television series Spitting Image. The puppet is dressed in a blue dress shirt, blue suit coat and wears a tie with images of U.S. currency. The puppet's eyes are wire-operated and the eyelids are air-operated. The British television program Spitting Image was a satirical look at English politics and popular culture. It ran from 1984-1996, and two TV specials were produced for American viewers and aired on NBC. Height, 28 inches." Source: Julien's Auctions


© Peter Fluck and Roger Law, ceramic teapot, 10 inches tall.
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© Steve Brodner 1987

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© Act Up 1987
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© Robert Risko 1987

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© Robbie Conal 1987

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© Stephen Kroninger 1987, "The central remaining question is the role of the President in the Iran-contra affair. On this critical point, the shredding of documents by Poindexter, North and others, and the death of Casey, leave the record incomplete." ---Congressional report

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© David Cowles 1987
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© Jules Feiffer 1987
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© Mark Alan Stamaty 1988
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© Edward Sorel 1991
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© Robert Risko 1992


© Jack Davis
A Box of Magazines 24
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Francois Szalay - Colos
posted:
Collection of Stephen Kroninger

Colos' friends know their letters are often the beginning of artworks, and they delight in challenging the artist by sending him mail with the stamp affixed in strange places"
Rose DeNeve, PRINT Magazine 1971

"These collages give me the most pleasure. I have no preconceptions about them; I simply look at the envelope and see what it suggests. Then I start drawing and the composition just happens"
Francois Szalay - COLOS, PRINT Magazine 1971
Collection of Victor Charles Juhasz

 This is a joint post by Victor Juhasz and I, although all I did was download and organize the images. This came out of a chance discussion we were having a while back about envelope art. Victor mentioned the work of Colos. I did a quick Google search and discovered there was a rather substantial selection of his work being offered up on Ebay. The envelopes shown here all come from that auction. We bid and won a few for ourselves. Hope you find the work as rewarding as we do. Victor wrote the text that follows.
  Colos was a fascinating person, probably one of the most fascinating I've known in my life, and like most Hungarians, very Magyar centric, ego driven, brilliant and utterly opinionated, and of course, right.  Endless stories, all memorable and better than fiction.  He was a young man around 19 when he found himself spending a number of years in the Communist prison system, the Gulag, working in coal mines.  He was also pretty inflexible and combative when it came to dealing with art directors and didn't have all that much good to say about them and the restrictions placed on his points of view in his work.  Considering how bright his star had shined in the 50's the 60's through the 70's, even into the 80's, near the end of his life he would confess to feeling at a sort of dead end with regard to how to deal with editorial interference and seemed to imply that he didn't see much future in his career.  His uncompromising attitude to his work and how it was to be displayed in a perverse way worked against him in that he is pretty much unknown to present generation graphic artists and students, which is a true loss in terms of what his work has to offer.  His work was almost always engaging because it was very smart, very funny in a satiric way; the collages beautifully composed and logical even as they could be wild. 

He started a visual diary in 1976 that developed quite a notorious reputation because of the content matter.  In 1986 a museum was offering to exhibit the diary but with certain content edited because of the potential offensiveness.  Colos was adamant about how to exhibit the work and declined the museum's offer.  "They either accept it as it is or go to hell."  When I read that in a PRINT magazine feature on him and his envelope collages, it sounded just like him.  "Bullshit" was another favorite phrase. 

Coming out of the brutalities and intrigues of the Communist system he also seemed to have developed an adaptive, very self protective,  way of presenting himself to the people he knew.  The Colos I knew may not have necessarily been the Colos others knew.  He was careful about how and what to reveal about himself.  This realization came later after his passing, talking to friends and noticing that we all had parts of a story but never the whole.  Even after we pieced our versions together, there was an uncertainty about whether it was complete or even misleading. 

He once told me about standing on a corner in NYC near Carnegie Hall right next to Count Basie.  He turned to the Count and said, "It is because of you that I have one kidney."  Basie looked at him confused and asked him to explain.  Colos went on to tell him what a great fan he was of Jazz and how he was listening to Basie records in his apartment when (somebody must have ratted him out) the secret police broke in, confiscated the music, and took him down to the station where he was beaten so badly that one of his kidneys was ruptured.  Then it was off to prison/the Gulag(?) for subversive activities.  Basie listened to this and when the story was finished, said to Colos, "Let me buy you a drink."   So they went to a nearby bar and had a few and talked some more.  You can't make this shit up.  And he had tons of stories like this.  Every so often I think of him and miss those lunchtime conversations we would have either in the NEW YORK TIMES cafeteria or at a favorite hangout, a Brazilian restaurant not far from the TIMES, where I would join my friend John Cayea, the art director for the Week-In-Review and another brilliant Hungarian artist illustrator, Istvan Ventilla and the Romanian illustrator Nicolai Ascui.  Those get togethers were head spinning events- John and I would just sit back and listen to the world explained from an Eastern European, Iron Curtain survivor, viewpoint.  Ventilla has since disappeared, without a trace; it's been a long time since anything has been heard from or about him.


Collection of Stephen Kroninger




Collection of Victor Charles Juhasz

















Collection of Victor Charles Juhasz

Collection of Victor Charles Juhasz


Collection of Victor Charles Juhasz

Collection of Stephen Kroninger



112th Congress
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