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Cathie Bleck
"Rarely Home" : Cleveland @ Maria Neil Art Project : Cathie Bleck Amy Casey
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Around April this year Amy Casey, a fabulous artist here in Cleveland, who has been featured multiple times in New American Paintings, asked me to join her in a show here at home. I was thrilled and honored to show with her at a new project space in the Waterloo Arts District,  Maria Neil Art Projects  (There are some photos from the opening on the gallery website).  Neither of us show in Cleveland regularly so the title "Rarely Home" was especially fitting and I created a body of small and intimate pieces returning to my signature style of black and white works, often taking work on the road this past year.
These paintings provide little windows into the emotions that occur from the pleasures of leaving "home" which to is not always the physical home but rather the "place" we feel most at ease.  When I think of physical travel away from my house I also think about the dual curse of what is left in the trail (someone is always excited that you are visiting and someone else is always sad that you are gone).  It is a lot of work to travel, but I have always viewed it as an experience embracing the unknown and enjoy thinking fast on my feet when obstacles occur.  Perhaps it is at a core level a necessary act for people in order to understand the meaning of their own lives. We sometimes don't see what is staring us right in our face, we must leave our comfort zone and step into darkness in order to see the light. 
From the book The Power of the Obvious by Aldo Papone:
travel, (a word that comes from travail, meaning work or torment-and “travail”, in turn, was derived from the Latin word tripalium, which was a three-staked instrument of torture!) Historically, humans have encountered travel as a marvel that brings light and wonder into our lives, making knowledge and experience accessible. 
I spent about 6 months this year traveling, gathering research for my artwork, often bringing smaller works with me on the road to work on.  For 3-4 months of the year I worked prolifically in my Cleveland Heights studio, inspired by the visual vocabulary and experiences of what I have taken in from my travels, these include hundreds of journals some of which will be on view in this show.  In many ways these journals are how I process information and heighten recording personal memories-my external hardrive of my brain.  
This body of work includes fourteen intimate black and white works, three dimensional color pieces, as well as journals from the past few years cascading over a dimensional waterfall of kaolin and blue pigments painted doors. Also included are laser jet cut pieces in clay board in the forms of a light box as well as an antique Samsonite suitcase which holds a small illuminated dimensional diorama which can be seen through a door peep hole on the outside.
These works are sort of little windows into the emotions that occur from the pleasures of leaving "home" which to is not always the physical home but rather the "place" we feel most at ease.  When I think of physical travel away from my house I also think about the dual curse of what is left in the trail (someone is always excited that you are visiting and someone else is always sad that you are gone).  It is a lot of work to travel, but I have always viewed it as an experience embracing the unknown and enjoy thinking fast on my feet when obstacles occur.  Perhaps it is at a core level a necessary act for people in order to understand the meaning of their own lives. We sometimes don't see what is staring us right in our face, we must leave our comfort zone and step into darkness in order to see the light. 
 
Exploring the meaning of travel : 
from the book The Power of the Obvious by Aldo Papone:
travel, (a word that comes from travail, meaning work or torment-and “travail”, in turn, was derived from the Latin word tripalium, which was a three-staked instrument of torture!) Historically, humans have encountered travel as a marvel that brings light and wonder into our lives, making knowledge and experience accessible. 
 
I spent about 6 months this year traveling, gathering research for my artwork, often bringing smaller works with me on the road to work on.  For 3-4 months of the year I worked prolifically in my Cleveland Heights studio, inspired by the visual vocabulary and experiences of what I have taken in from my travels, these include hundreds of journals some of which will be on view in this show.  In many ways these journals are how I process information and heighten recording personal memories-my external hardrive of my brain.  
 
I grew up on a tree farm just outside of Chicago, a very still life and after college moved to San Francisco then back to Chicago and then onto Dallas, England and New York City prior to being transplanted to Cleveland for the past 26 years. In this show “Rarely Home”, I am returning to my signature-style of black and white scratchboard (my personal "home" style)  in search of the portals of dreams, discoveries, adventures and the emotional aftermaths of what it means to be "rarely home" figuratively and subjectively.Humans beings are natural travelers.  –its an essential human activity, beyond commerce and leisure.  I spent 6 months traveling this year off and on, gathering research, sometimes working on small pieces on the road and spent the rest of the time working prolifically in my Cleveland Heights studio.  This past year I have traveled to Arizona, Idaho, Utah, San Francisco, New York City, four trips to Chicago, Vancouver, Boston and this November to Thailand. “Home” has become a migrating refuge for me, working up close to new discoveries that shed light into a creative pathway.  I am fascinated by the "energy" of travel; the tension of emotional bridges that become formed in the physical gaps between people combining with the residue created from the physical seperation from those who live with us daily.

 This body of work includes fourteen intimate black and white works as well as journals from the past few years cascading over a dimensional waterfall of kaolin and blue pigments painted on doors. Also included are laser jet cut pieces in clay board in the forms of a light box as well as an antique Samsonite suitcase which holds a small illuminated dimensional diorama which can be seen through a door peep hole on the outside.
These works are sort of little windows into the emotions that occur from the pleasures of leaving "home" which to is not always the physical home but rather the "place" we feel most at ease.  When I think of physical travel away from my house I also think about the dual curse of what is left in the trail (someone is always excited that you are visiting and someone else is always sad that you are gone).  It is a lot of work to travel, but I have always viewed it as an experience embracing the unknown and enjoy thinking fast on my feet when obstacles occur.  Perhaps it is at a core level a necessary act for people in order to understand the meaning of their own lives. We sometimes don't see what is staring us right in our face, we must leave our comfort zone and step into darkness in order to see the light. 
 
Exploring the meaning of travel : 
from the book The Power of the Obvious by Aldo Papone:
travel, (a word that comes from travail, meaning work or torment-and “travail”, in turn, was derived from the Latin word tripalium, which was a three-staked instrument of torture!) Historically, humans have encountered travel as a marvel that brings light and wonder into our lives, making knowledge and experience accessible. 
 
I spent about 6 months this year traveling, gathering research for my artwork, often bringing smaller works with me on the road to work on.  For 3-4 months of the year I worked prolifically in my Cleveland Heights studio, inspired by the visual vocabulary and experiences of what I have taken in from my travels, these include hundreds of journals some of which will be on view in this show.  In many ways these journals are how I process information and heighten recording personal memories-my external hardrive of my brain.  
 
I grew up on a tree farm just outside of Chicago, a very still life and after college moved to San Francisco then back to Chicago and then onto Dallas, England and New York City prior to being transplanted to Cleveland for the past 26 years. In this show “Rarely Home”, I am returning to my signature-style of black and white scratchboard (my personal "home" style)  in search of the portals of dreams, discoveries, adventures and the emotional aftermaths of what it means to be "rarely home" figuratively and subjectively.Humans beings are natural travelers.  –its an essential human activity, beyond commerce and leisure.  I spent 6 months traveling this year off and on, gathering research, sometimes working on small pieces on the road and spent the rest of the time working prolifically in my Cleveland Heights studio.  This past year I have traveled to Arizona, Idaho, Utah, San Francisco, New York City, four trips to Chicago, Vancouver, Boston and this November to Thailand. “Home” has become a migrating refuge for me, working up close to new discoveries that shed light into a creative pathway.  I am fascinated by the "energy" of travel; the tension of emotional bridges that become formed in the physical gaps between people combining with the residue created from the physical seperation from those who live with us daily.

 This body of work includes fourteen intimate black and white works as well as journals from the past few years cascading over a dimensional waterfall of kaolin and blue pigments painted on doors. Also included are laser jet cut pieces in clay board in the forms of a light box as well as an antique Samsonite suitcase which holds a small illuminated dimensional diorama which can be seen through a door peep hole on the outside.
 This body of work includes fourteen intimate black and white works as well as journals from the past few years cascading over a dimensional waterfall of kaolin and blue pigments painted on doors. Also included are laser jet cut pieces in clay board in the forms of a light box as well as an antique Samsonite suitcase which holds a small illuminated dimensional diorama which can be seen through a door peep hole on the outside.
 This body of work includes fourteen intimate black and white works as well as journals from the past few years cascading over a dimensional waterfall of kaolin and blue pigments painted on doors. Also included are laser jet cut pieces in clay board in the forms of a light box as well as an antique Samsonite suitcase which holds a small illuminated dimensional diorama which can be seen through a door peep hole on the outside.
 
 This body of work includes fourteen intimate black and white works as well as journals from the past few years cascading over a dimensional waterfall of kaolin and blue pigments painted on doors. Also included are laser jet cut pieces in clay board in the forms of a light box as well as an antique Samsonite suitcase which holds a small illuminated dimensional diorama which can be seen through a door peep hole on the outside.
 This body of work includes fourteen intimate black and white works as well as journals from the past few years cascading over a dimensional waterfall of kaolin and blue pigments painted on doors. Also included are laser jet cut pieces in clay board in the forms of a light box as well as an antique Samsonite suitcase which holds a small illuminated dimensional diorama which can be seen through a door peep hole on the outside.


Offered up a cascade of sketchbooks

Project spaces are liberating. It opens up room for exploration, so I played around with some laser cutting at Case Western University in the engineering building creating a lightbox as well as a diorama inside a suitcase with a lense for viewing.

Inside the viewfinder, difficult to photograph through the lense.

Amy Casey's work is highly detailed and epic in size for the kind of labor that is involved. It was a great exchange and success-thank you Cleveland. Here is a great little article in Belt Mag on Amy's work and Cleveland... it showcases the paintings she has in this current show.
Thank you Juxtapoz Magazine for featuring our show on your blog!
The energy in the art world in Cleveland is surging.  So many great articles about it in national news and here is a recent one in Arts Antiques Design. It is an affordable city with world class museums, lots of opportunities to make art, teach art and experiment.  There are inexpensive studio spaces and affordable live/work homes.  It is halfway between Chicago and New York City and 6 hours to Toronto.  Let me know if you art pals are ever in town, I'd be happy to show you around!



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