top
log-in
Carl Wiens
Surveillance
posted:
It's an uneasy subject. Something that we live with everyday. We connect, we locate, search and communicate. Ask any question and a response pops up immediately. Remember that obscure reference but can't place it? It's right there on your mobile device.
 
On a personal level, I have serious misgivings about carrying around a tracking device that can plot your every move, your shopping patterns and queries, who your friends are and what you 'like'. But it's a part of our modern lives. What are the implications, good and bad?

What's your comfort level?
 
I worked on this full-page article for Security Management magazine. Thanks to art directors Roy Comiskey and Elizabeth Lankes.
House of Falconer
posted:

Alexandre Fida is making a difference.

Alex lives in Prince Edward County. Between all of the projects he has on the go - does he ever sleep? I am impressed by his sense of design and a wilingness to experiment, to take on the projects others long abandoned, and bring new life to old buildings. On top of that, he has redesigned Angeline's and the Walter in Bloomfield, where he is the Innkeeper.

Let's start with the House of Falconer. This building of historic significance was mouldering in neglect for as long as I lived in Picton (16 years), and certainly much longer. The last owner of the building was Thera Falconer, who ran an antique boutique on Main Street. She passed away in 2008.

The house was built circa 1858 by Captain Downes (an accomplished artist). It is a quaint Victorian cottage style building with a towering gable peak at the front. Inside is 12 foot ceilings and large, bright windows lighting the front parlours. As is the case with so many heritage buildings, it stood by while other buildings around were removed and replaced with strip malls, parking lots and a large, monolithic bank plunked directly in front of the former front gardens, blocking the best sightlines of the house. I was expecting the bulldozers to show up, as they have so many times along thoroughfare of Picton, to remove the building and erect another shortsighted retail space or parking lot.

Alex aims to restore as much of the original fabric of the building as possible, treading lightly. Along the way, he has been dusting off old chandeliers, discovering vintage film projectors and quirky retro mermaid wallpaper, amongst other things.

Alex is also working with a team of restoration and landscape architects, and documenting the process with photographer Johnny Cy Lam.

Alex commissioned me to design a logo and identity for the project. I wanted to use lettering with character, a hand-rendered font that reflected history and Alex's European heritage. I did some digging and utililized a type based on a turn-of-the century German script.

Looking at the history, character and scope of the project, I was also inspired to design and interwoven monogram. This design also incorporates a vine, I thought it captured the process of growth and change, and a bit of the 'beautiful decay' that attracted Alex to the project.

The House of Falconer is currently home to artist's studios and is holding an Open House, this Friday (June 12) from 5-9. 1 Walton Street, Picton. Meet the creative residents and visit their studios/shows - food from the Hubb as well.
 

Alex is also working on restoring a series of reclaimed buildings, including a beautiful log building from South Bay that was meticulously indexed, moved and rebuilt on the property behind Angeline's in Bloomfield. He's dubbed it the Babylon House (it was moved from a property on the cryptic-sounding Babylon Road).

 had the pleasure of working with Alex on the identity for Angeline's in Bloomfield as well. We decided on a two-colour rendering of the Inn - it's a beautiful building with a lot of great detail.

Pirate Radio
posted:
I illustrated this feature article for Phoenix Magazine. Brian Goddard, the art director told me I was a perfect fit for the job and my work came to mind as soon as he saw the article. Nice to get this piece, I enjoyed working on it, and the creative freedom an assignment like this brings.
Here's the opening spread:

The founder and operator of the station has an outlaw mentality, provoking authorities by naming the station KWFUCC, with an obviously cheeky reference to the FCC. He's known to be a chain smoker and a self-proclaimed champion of freedom. Here's a view of full page illustration. Lots of vintage radio elements mixed with pirate/clown elements, a fun place to explore.

Gesundheit
posted:
Is flu season over yet? Just when you think spring has arrived, and you are out of the woods, it hits you. Like that last winter weather event, just after you took off the snow tires.
At this time of year, it's a matter of recharging the batteries, gearing up for spring. Can't wait for the warmer, friendlier weather, and the sense of purpose and energy that comes with it. I've been busy with a lot of editorial work so far this year. For some reason, most of it has been health related.
Yes, I am fine, thank you. Doing well. But this kind of work can make you start self-diagnosing.
So here's my recent medical history, illustration-wise.

Learning to Say No to Dialysis, written by Paula Span for the New York Times Science section. Art director Audrey Razgaitis and Cathy Gilmore Barnes.

Becoming Bionic, for the Robb Report, about advances in transplant technology. Art director Lisa Lewis.

And lastly, here's a full-page illustration for Reader's Digest Canada. It's a testimonial of a woman who endured two years of a debilitating spinal condition, suffering misdiagnosis, confusion and then a full resolution of her health problems. Not really my kind of story, but my Mom was totally impressed by seeing this published.
Gesundheit!
Recent Articles
Topics
Archive

Portfolio (50)

Mecanismos (26)

Little Big Spots (37)

Op-Ed (6)

Journal comics (6)

Birdhouse City (16)
More work
Birdhouse City
Links to Articles