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Carl Wiens
Season Opener
posted:
I am excited to participate in this year's Season Opener, a group show at the Steamwhistle Brewery in Toronto, opening on Wednesday, April 2. The show features 30 bats customized by a diverse & talented group of illustrators and designers.

I reimagined one of the beautiful Garrison Creek handcrafted hardwood bats for the show. My piece is titled 'Moonshot'
In baseball, a moonshot is referred to as a home run that is hit a long distance at a high velocity and deep angle. Moonshots normally range in the 410–660 foot area. Home runs hit farther than that are considered moonshots, but none farther than that have been recorded (or estimated). The name "Moonshot" comes from Wally Moon. Whenever Moon would hit a home run, these home runs would be referenced in newspapers as "Moon Shots". His home runs mostly came at the L.A. Coliseum, but his home runs gained more recognition for being mostly opposite-field home runs, as he was a left-handed batter, and the fence in right field was 440 feet from home plate. (from Wikipedia)
I once saw Reggie Jackson hit the ball right out of Tiger Stadium. A Moon shot. I was also obsessed with the Apollo Missions growing up, and the shape of the bat reminded me of a rocket. So I based my design on the Saturn V rocket, the workhorse that carried the astronauts to the moon. I added stabilizing fins to the bottom of the bat and had some fun with the aesthetics.

Here's the final. I decided to screenprint the type onto the bat, I wanted to get the squarish NASA look just right. Glad it all came together.
So much hope this time of year, a new season underway and spring just around the corner. Looking forward to it all.

Medicine meets Genetics
posted:
Every week, it seems, biopharmaceutical companies announce new breakthroughs in “personalized medicine” – customized health care where the goal is to tailor drug therapies to individuals. Competition between gene sequencing businesses to catapult us into the age of the $1000 genome drives much of the hoopla. Gene-based companion diagnostics, for cancer drugs especially, promise to help doctors discern which patients are likeliest to benefit from which treatments, curtailing the need for mix-and-match, trial-and-error, one-size-fits-all chemotherapies.

But what if every new drug – however much more effective than current treatments – works only for smaller and smaller numbers of patients? And what happens to those minimally beneficial but mega-profitable blockbusters that now dominate cancer treatment when it becomes clearer that only small percentages of the people taking them will truly benefit, people who now can be identified prospectively?


The Cure for Some Could Cost Us All - by Barry Werth
Interesting topic - I was given the chance to work with a half-page layout by art director Heather Hopp-Bruce for the Boston Globe Op-Ed page.. It's a complicated, modern issue, tied to human genomes, customization, medicine and economics. It was a challenge to dive in and cover the topic in a nuanced manner. Miracle cure or another burdensome expense for consumers to carry? Here is a detail:

Here is the full Illustration. This ran from top to bottom on the page.

I worked on a number of concepts, here some of my other sketches:

Covering your Assets
posted:

I could really use this technology. I lose my keys all the time. RFID tracking allows manufacturers and businesses to locate and track their assets during the manufacturing process, in transit and in storage or inventory.
I decided to keep things simple in this illustration, showing location in different context through the supply chain. I used an isometric perspective so that the message wouldn't get lost in the details. I have worked with art diretor Roy Comiskey at Security Management on a number of tech-related articles, and I always enjoy the challenge of bringing new elements to the work.
Here's the piece in the final layout.

Science of the Times
posted:
We live in an age of uncertainty. I illustrated this article for the New York Times Science section this past week for a new column by George Johnson called Raw Data.
New Truths That Only One Can See

From the article:
Since 1955, The Journal of Irreproducible Results has offered “spoofs, parodies, whimsies, burlesques, lampoons and satires” about life in the laboratory. Among its greatest hits: “Acoustic Oscillations in Jell-O, With and Without Fruit, Subjected to Varying Levels of Stress” and “Utilizing Infinite Loops to Compute an Approximate Value of Infinity.” The good-natured jibes are a backhanded celebration of science. What really goes on in the lab is, by implication, of a loftier, more serious nature.

It has been jarring to learn in recent years that a reproducible result may actually be the rarest of birds. Replication, the ability of another lab to reproduce a finding, is the gold standard of science, reassurance that you have discovered something true. But that is getting harder all the time. With the most accessible truths already discovered, what remains are often subtle effects, some so delicate that they can be conjured up only under ideal circumstances, using highly specialized techniques.

 
It's no laughing matter, and it has implications for research and development in the future. It's a great read, take the time to read the rest of the article.
Over the past few years it feels that the foundations of so many different things have been rattled. It's been a rough period, personally, and I know it has for a lot of folks everywhere. Now that the new year is here, and spring is coming soon, I feel a bit of optimism. I can say this with certainty: I am very happy to have worked on this. Thanks to Peter Morance at the Times for this one!
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It's been a while since I have posted. Here's a few pieces from my digital 'sketchbook'.

Baby drone

Reconstructive


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