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Carl Wiens
Pirate Radio
posted:
I illustrated this feature article for Phoenix Magazine. Brian Goddard, the art director told me I was a perfect fit for the job and my work came to mind as soon as he saw the article. Nice to get this piece, I enjoyed working on it, and the creative freedom an assignment like this brings.
Here's the opening spread:

The founder and operator of the station has an outlaw mentality, provoking authorities by naming the station KWFUCC, with an obviously cheeky reference to the FCC. He's known to be a chain smoker and a self-proclaimed champion of freedom. Here's a view of full page illustration. Lots of vintage radio elements mixed with pirate/clown elements, a fun place to explore.

Gesundheit
posted:
Is flu season over yet? Just when you think spring has arrived, and you are out of the woods, it hits you. Like that last winter weather event, just after you took off the snow tires.
At this time of year, it's a matter of recharging the batteries, gearing up for spring. Can't wait for the warmer, friendlier weather, and the sense of purpose and energy that comes with it. I've been busy with a lot of editorial work so far this year. For some reason, most of it has been health related.
Yes, I am fine, thank you. Doing well. But this kind of work can make you start self-diagnosing.
So here's my recent medical history, illustration-wise.

Learning to Say No to Dialysis, written by Paula Span for the New York Times Science section. Art director Audrey Razgaitis and Cathy Gilmore Barnes.

Becoming Bionic, for the Robb Report, about advances in transplant technology. Art director Lisa Lewis.

And lastly, here's a full-page illustration for Reader's Digest Canada. It's a testimonial of a woman who endured two years of a debilitating spinal condition, suffering misdiagnosis, confusion and then a full resolution of her health problems. Not really my kind of story, but my Mom was totally impressed by seeing this published.
Gesundheit!
The Lab
posted:
'Power lacks moral or principles. It only has interests.'
- Horacio Castellanos Moya
Here's an assortment of oddities and orphans. I don't keep sketchbooks, but I do a lot of experimental collages. So I put together a handful of recent pieces. The power piece found a home in an upcoming issue of The Baffler. Thrilled to connect with Patrick JB Flynn.

Startup! A new piece for The Baffler.

Comparative Anatomy

More in the Mecanismos series...
Obtuse Alien

Flea

Selfie - this was part of the portrait exhibition at the Pictoplasma conference.

Raw Data
posted:
I posted earlier about my regular feature with the New York Times science section, a monthly column written by George Johnson. It's called Raw Data, and it asks the big questions that are integral to the advancement of scientific knowledge and research. I enjoy reading these and, of course, illustrating the series. Brilliantly written and thought-provoking. Please click through and take the time to read these.
The first piece shown here was created while I was on the road, in Idaho at the time. I drove out to Portland this summer and decided to take this on just before I disappeared into Yellowstone Park for three days. Squeaked out the final somehow (the joys of being an illustrator), but I was thrilled with how it turned out. Sometimes the pressure cooker situation produces great results!

Beyond Energy, Matter, Time and Space. Humans might think we can figure out the ultimate mysteries, but there is no reason to believe that we have all the pieces necessary for a theory of everything.

The Intelligent-Life Lottery: With billions of stars in our galaxy, there must be other civilizations capable of transmitting electromagnetic waves. By scouring the sky with radio telescopes, we just might intercept a signal. But if we want to 'win' these sweepstakes, we will have to buy more tickets.

A Future as Cloudy as Their Past: When the Anasazi abandoned the cities they had worked so long to build on the Colorado Plateau, it had something to do with climate, but drawing lessons from their opaque past may be as difficult as predicting our clouded future.
Thanks to AD Peter Morance for giving me the opportunity to be a part of this!
_________________
The Upshot is a great running feature in the NYT. A lot of great thinking and surprising observation. I recently illustrated a piece on the influence of money and sponsorship upon scientific research. Some interesting and disturbing findings.

To get more out of science, show the rejected research.
Nice to be a part of this, thanks to AD Luke Shuman!
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